neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

The Lancet: Doctors confirm Motörhead’s reputation as one of the most hardcore rock’n’roll acts on earth
German doctors highlight the potential dangers surrounding headbanging in a Case Report published in The Lancet. Ariyan Pirayesh Islamian and colleagues from the Hannover Medical School, detail the case of a man who developed a chronic subdural haematoma (bleeding in the brain) after headbanging at a Motörhead concert.
In January 2013, a 50-year-old man came to the neurosurgical department of Hannover Medical School with a 2 week history of a constant worsening headache affecting the whole head. Although his medical history was unremarkable and he reported no previous head trauma, 4 weeks before he had been headbanging at a Motörhead concert.
A cranial CT confirmed the man had a chronic subdural haematoma on the right side of his brain. Surgeons removed the haematoma (blood clot) through a burr hole and used closed system subdural drainage for 6 days after surgery. His headache subsided and he was well on his last examination 2 months later.
Headbanging refers to the violent and rhythmic movement of the head synchronous with rock music, most commonly heavy metal. Motörhead, undoubtedly one of the greatest rock’n’roll bands on earth, helped to pioneer speed metal where fast tempo songs that have an underlying rhythm of 200bpm are aspired to.
Although generally considered harmless, headbanging-related injuries include carotid artery dissection, whiplash, mediastinal emphysema, and odontoid neck fracture. This is the first reported case showing evidence that headbanging can cause “chronic” subdural haematoma.
"Even though there are only a few documented cases of subdural haematomas, the incidence may be higher because the symptoms of this type of brain injury are often clinically silent or cause only mild headache that resolves spontaneously", explains lead author Dr Ariyan Pirayesh Islamian.**
"This case serves as evidence in support of Motörhead’s reputation as one of the most hardcore rock’n’roll acts on earth, if nothing else because of their music’s contagious speed drive and the hazardous potential for headbanging fans to suffer brain injury."

neurosciencestuff:

The Lancet: Doctors confirm Motörhead’s reputation as one of the most hardcore rock’n’roll acts on earth

German doctors highlight the potential dangers surrounding headbanging in a Case Report published in The Lancet. Ariyan Pirayesh Islamian and colleagues from the Hannover Medical School, detail the case of a man who developed a chronic subdural haematoma (bleeding in the brain) after headbanging at a Motörhead concert.

In January 2013, a 50-year-old man came to the neurosurgical department of Hannover Medical School with a 2 week history of a constant worsening headache affecting the whole head. Although his medical history was unremarkable and he reported no previous head trauma, 4 weeks before he had been headbanging at a Motörhead concert.

A cranial CT confirmed the man had a chronic subdural haematoma on the right side of his brain. Surgeons removed the haematoma (blood clot) through a burr hole and used closed system subdural drainage for 6 days after surgery. His headache subsided and he was well on his last examination 2 months later.

Headbanging refers to the violent and rhythmic movement of the head synchronous with rock music, most commonly heavy metal. Motörhead, undoubtedly one of the greatest rock’n’roll bands on earth, helped to pioneer speed metal where fast tempo songs that have an underlying rhythm of 200bpm are aspired to.

Although generally considered harmless, headbanging-related injuries include carotid artery dissection, whiplash, mediastinal emphysema, and odontoid neck fracture. This is the first reported case showing evidence that headbanging can cause “chronic” subdural haematoma.

"Even though there are only a few documented cases of subdural haematomas, the incidence may be higher because the symptoms of this type of brain injury are often clinically silent or cause only mild headache that resolves spontaneously", explains lead author Dr Ariyan Pirayesh Islamian.**

"This case serves as evidence in support of Motörhead’s reputation as one of the most hardcore rock’n’roll acts on earth, if nothing else because of their music’s contagious speed drive and the hazardous potential for headbanging fans to suffer brain injury."

biomedicalephemera

biomedicalephemera:

Physicians with Head Mirrors

Ever wonder where the stereotypical headband mirror thing that you see on old illustrations of doctors came from?

It’s actually a reflector. Before we had battery-powered and flexible electrical lights, gas and oil-powered flames were the best we could do, but you don’t want to put that too close to the patient.

The concave reflective surface of the mirror focuses the diffuse light to a point inside the patient, which the physician can see through the hole in the center of the device.

Today, these reflectors are not frequently used in developed nations, as their primary purpose (otolaryngology - that is, ear, nose, and throat doctors) now has instruments which can illuminate the cavities being examined without an external source of light. However, they’re still very useful in countries with intermittent or unreliable power sources, and are often kept on hand in surgical suites and hospitals in those countries, in case of power outage during a procedure.

Diseases of the Nose and Accessory Cavities. W. Spencer Watson, 1890.

supervaca

supervaca:

panicmoon15:

panicmoon15:

the 7 y/o boy who lives next door doesn’t want to go in the house to bed and i just heard his dad use the old “you live under my roof, you live by my rules” and the kid just shouted back “im not under your roof im under the sky and thats god’s roof and he wants me to play out for longer!”

i can’t stop laughing.

update: now he’s scootering down the street singing ‘we didn’t start the fire’ while his dad chases him

I wish I had been that kid. 

raewynrapunzel

voiceofnature:

Callaway Gardens is located in Pine Mountain, Georgia, on 6,500 acres. It was founded in 1952 to promote and protect native azalea species. Today, Callaway Gardens features a wide variety of recreational attractions including a large enclosed butterfly habitat and butterfly center, and a wide variety of cultivars and native plants.

Callaway Gardens is so pretty that I once biked over 20 miles on the trails there in one day.  I was so busy being amazed by the scenery that I forgot to get tired and wasn’t even sore the next day.  I hope I can go back sometime sooner rather than later.